The January 2011 CBDI Journal is available now for download. This issue focuses on Cloud Computing.

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EDITORIAL: HEAD IN THE CLOUDS?

PRACTICE GUIDE: MAKING SENSE OF CLOUD COMPUTING

In this edition of the CBDI Journal we commence with guidance on definitions of the components of the Cloud. Clearly large enterprises will have complex Cloud strategies that comprise a mix of solutions, and a need to sort out the nomenclature, not just of the Cloud, but also of the momentum business which will include many of the Cloud technologies deployed as point solutions.

The terms virtualization, utility computing and Cloud computing are often used interchangeably which can be very confusing. This report aims to provide clarification - to identify the similarities and differences in those characteristics, and provide a framework in which organizations can decide which capabilities they require in specific situations – as it is unlikely that one model alone will suit all requirements. By Lawrence Wilkes

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PRACTICE GUIDE: BUSINESS DRIVEN CLOUD STRATEGY

Then we explore a Business Driven Cloud Strategy - how large enterprises should make explicit links between their Cloud computing strategy and their business goals in order to move beyond the tactical and technology centric activity that is inevitable in early markets. Of course nearly everyone (well in large enterprises anyway) is focused on Cloud as a technology for infrastructure because this represents low hanging fruit. And that’s fair enough because there’s a lot of learning to be done. But we recommend strongly that this needs to be undertaken with an eye to the future roadmap. Just consider at what point did Amazon realize it had a major new business in prospect?

Cloud is rapidly gaining acceptance in the provisioning of utility IT resources, but we must look beyond the purely technology considerations to understand the broader implications and opportunities for business. In this report we outline a roadmap planning approach that integrates Cloud Computing, SOA and BPM in delivering new business models. By David Sprott

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PRACTICE GUIDE: INFORMATION SERVICES ARCHITECTURE FOR RESPONSIVE PROCESS MANAGEMENT

Finally in the third CBDI Journal report this month we push the envelope further on information architecture in context with responsive business processes. Over the years we have published several reports on the intersection of information architecture and business intelligence, and tooling is now available to realize the concepts we have been exploring. We illustrate how business process behaviors can expand beyond the transactional to incorporate rules and automated, real time responses to a wider range of events, rather than after the fact from data warehouse or similar systems. Clearly in order to do this we need to rewrite the book on how we architect data requirements for the business process.

Business process management is evolving to incorporate dynamic response to events. In this environment the information services architecture must also evolve to provide a broader set of information that complements the transactional business process perspective. By David Sprott

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